Atonement: Bible Basics

This post looks at the major Scriptures about the atonement. It also asks, is healing in the atonement?

Atonement literally means in English at-one-ment or being one with God or being reconciled to him (the -ment suffix means “the result of”).

It is the extensive and costly process of reconciling sinners to God.

Let’s use the Question-and-Answer format and number the main points for clarity and conciseness.

I.. What is the problem to overcome?

This question asks, why was atonement necessary?

Is. 6 is a wonderful passage that describes a holy man—Isaiah—in the very presence of God, and he saw himself as undone and ruined, because he was an unclean man living among an unclean people. God reached out to him and put a coal on his lips to speak with power and anointing. God cleansed him.

Is. 27:9 talks about the extreme need of Israel’s sins to be removed, and one way to do this was to cut down fertility poles and crush altars to false gods. But this would not bring about reconciliation for all of humanity, forever, but the need for it is clear.

Dan. 9:24 speaks of Israel living in exile seventy years to finish transgression and atone for their wickedness. The verb “atone” means to “wipe away” or appease or placate God’s righteous demands.

John 1:29 shows John the Baptist proclaiming to the people about Jesus, “Behold the lamb of God that takes away the sin of the world!”

So the problem to be overcome is the sinfulness of humanity that separates humans from God. Now how do they be reconciled?

II.. How is atonement done?

1.. Blood must be shed.

Lev. 16:11 and 18 requires blood to be shed for the high priest on the Day of Atonement before he can enter the tabernacle.

Heb. 9:19-22 says that Moses sprinkled the items in the tabernacle and the tabernacle itself with the blood of animals, to cleanse it, for without the shedding of blood, there is no remission (release) from sins.

The New Testament trims these requirements to the sacrifice of Christ, but this once-and-for-all sacrifice has an OT background. The atonement of Christ on the cross on which he shed his blood is eternal, not yearly or daily.

2.. A substitutionary sacrifice must be offered.

Lev. 4:13-26 says that when the whole Israelite community sins unintentionally or a man sins unintentionally or a leader does the same, then he must sacrifice an animal, and the leader is to place his hands on it, so the sin is transferred, and the animal stands in for the human.

Lev. 5:5-10 teaches that if anyone—a man or woman—sins, he or she must bring an animal to pay the penalty for his or her sin and he or she must confess his or her sin.

Is. 53:4-7 speaks of the Suffering Servant—who, it will turn out to be—is Jesus the Messiah, who took our infirmities and bore our suffering, and we considered him punished and stricken by God and pierced for our transgressions and crushed for our iniquities.

1 John 2:2 is clear: Jesus is the atoning sacrifice for our sins, and not for our sins alone, but for the sins of the whole world.

So now it is clear where the doctrine of penal substitutionary atonement comes from. Perfectly righteous Jesus stood in place of perfectly unrighteous humanity, and paid the penalty for our sins, as our substitute on the cross. We should have been on the cross, not him.

And now it is clear why his blood must be shed. It is for the remission of sins.

III.. How does Christ provide atonement for the sins of humanity?

1.. He is symbolized in Old Testament sacrifices.

The blood of Passover lamb was used to put on the doorpost of the ancient Israelites living in Egypt, and when the death angel saw it, he would “pass over” the house and not wreak God’s judgment on the people. And the lamb had to be without defect (Exod. 12:1-7, 12-13).

1 Cor. 5:7 says that Christ the Passover lamb has been sacrificed; therefore the Corinthians (and we too) needed to get rid of the yeast or sin. This teaches that the atonement produces righteousness and godly living. But the main point is that Christ stood in our place and held back God’s judgment. Now we can go free from our own personal Egypt. Jesus was also without defect (sin) (Heb. 4:15).

Is. 53:7 says that a lamb was led to the slaughter, and this was the Suffering Servant, Jesus.

As noted, John 1:29 says that Jesus was the lamb of God who takes away the sin of the world. And John the Baptist once again calls him the lamb of God (John 1:36).

In a magnificent passage, 1 Peter 1:18-19, Peter teaches us that Christ, who is the unblemished lamb of God, redeemed us through his precious blood. As noted, the Passover lamb had to be without defect.

In Rev. 5:6-7, John sees a vision of the slain lamb that was worthy to open the scroll. When the lamb took the scroll, the angels sang a song of praise which began: “Worthy is the lamb!”

2.. He fulfills the Day of Atonement.

Heb. 9:7-14 and 23-28 says that Christ is both the high priest and sacrifice. He did the sacrifice once and for all, which lasts eternally and brought through the eternal Spirit redemption for humanity.

Please see How Jesus Fulfills the Day of Atonement

IV.. What does the New Testament teach about Christ’s atonement?

1.. Christ is our atoning sacrifice.

Rom. 3:25 is the clearest verse on Christ’s sacrificial atonement. It says God himself presented Christ as a sacrifice of atonement through the shedding of his blood. This atoning sacrifice is to be received by faith, not by law keeping or by your own penance or your own sacrifices of righteous acts.

2.. His atoning sacrifice is eternal, not daily or yearly.

Heb. 9:28 says that Christ was sacrificed once and for all to take away the sins of the many.

1 John 4:10 instructs about God’s love. The greatest proof or demonstration about his love is not that we love God, but that he loved us. How deep does his love go? He sent his Son as an atoning sacrifice for our sins.

V.. What are the benefits or results of Christ’s atonement?

1.. Our guilt is transferred over to the sacrificial offering.

Lev. 1:3-4 and 16:21-22 teach the ancient Israelite was to lay his hand on the animal, in a transference of the sin and guilt from the human to the animal.

1 Cor. 5:20-21 is a great passage to illustrate how Christ became a sin offering, so we can become the righteousness of God. Then in v. 20, Paul had written: “Be reconciled to God.” So reconciliation and atonement are related.

Heb. 9:14 and 10:22 says Christ’s blood cleanses our guilty conscience from our sin.

These passages teach us that our guilt is transferred over to Christ, and his righteousness is transferred over to us. It is called the Great Exchange.

2.. Our sins are forgiven.

In Lev. 4:26, 31, and 35, the man who offered the animals in various sacrifices has made appropriate atonement, and his sins are forgiven.

Heb. 3:23-27 is rich in meaning, and it could be studied in various translations. But one main point is that God declaring us righteous says that our sins are forgiven.

Heb. 9:22 says that without the shedding of blood there is no remission or forgiveness of sins, or stated positively: with the shedding of blood there is forgiveness of sins.

Eph. 1:7 says that in Christ we have redemption through his blood and forgiveness of sin, and his rich grace must be extended—and it is right now.

3.. Our sins are purified.

1 John 1:7 says his blood purifies us from our sins.

This goes back to the Old Testament that says sprinkled blood cleanses the objects in the tabernacle and the tabernacle itself and the people. Christ fulfills this process, and now we receive it by faith.

4.. We are freed from sins.

Rev. 1:5 says it clearly that we are freed from our sins by his blood. This means that sin no longer has power over us. Old habits and addictions can be broken by the blood of Christ, and the blood stands in for the entire sacrifice process.

5.. We are redeemed.

Rom. 3:24-25 says that we have been justified freely—without our paying a price—or declared us righteous through the Christ’s sacrifice of atonement and redemption.

And, as noted, 1 Pet. 1:18 says we have been redeemed by the precious blood of the unblemished lamb.

Redemption means God purchased us or bought us out of our enslavement to sin, and the price paid is the blood of Christ. Who was paid? Satan? No. The Scripture is not clear, but most theologians say God’s justice was paid because God himself presented Christ as an atoning sacrifice. He demanded justice and he himself paid it for us, since we could never pay it; our own sins put us far below the price range. A working-class man can never buy a huge mansion, but what if the owner gave it to him?

6.. We are saved.

Rom. 5:9 teaches that we have been justified by his blood. That means he paid for our justification or our being declared righteous. Justification means a declaration of righteousness.

7.. We are reconciled to God.

Rom 5:10 follows 5:9 in the previous point. Christ’s blood reconciled us to God.

Col. 1:20 says that the fulness of deity lived in Christ, and through him God reconciled all things to himself by making peace through his blood on the cross.

In reconciliation, God did not move. We did. We rebelled, and now he is on a long search to bring humanity back to himself. However, the sins of humanity have to be atoned for, because God’s justice demands payment for our wrongs, much like a criminal has to pay for his wrongs. After he does, then he can be reconciled back into society. However, Christ stepped in and paid the penalty by going through his sacrifice in our place. Now we are reconciled to God through him.

8.. We have peace with God.

Col. 1:20 says this at the end of the verse (see the previous point).

9.. We are made holy.

Heb. 13:12 says Jesus died outside the camp to make us holy by his blood. This refers to burning the sin offering outside the camp, because it is a sin offering (Exod. 29:14). The presence of sin must be ceremoniously removed from God’s holy people. And the burning refers to God’s justice-wrath-judgment. By this offering the people were made holy or separated from the world, the flesh (sin nature), and the devil. They were consecrated to God.

10.. We are reconciled to other Christians of different cultures and religions.

Eph. 2:14-18 is another rich passage that can be studied for hours. We used to have a wall of hostility between each other, but Christ’s peace destroyed it, by setting aside the in his sacrificial flesh the laws and its commands and regulations. His purpose was to create one new humanity, in one body—his own—and reconcile them through the cross.

This reconciliation must be done in Christ, not in other cultures and religions.

11.. The power of the devil is disarmed and broken.

Col. 2:15 says that Jesus disarmed the spiritual authorities in the heavenly realm through the cross.

Heb. 2:14-15 instructs us about Christ’s death. He shared in our humanity so that by his death he would deliver us from the power of the devil that held sway over death and free us who feared death.

VII.. Is healing in the atonement?

The question is not worded correctly because everything is “in” the atonement. Every benefit that God offers us, itemized in the previous point, flows out of the atonement, even healing (1 Pet. 2:24; Is. 53:5).

The question people argue over should really be worded thus: Is healing guaranteed in the atonement? Or, will people always get healed in the atonement?

And the answer is no.

Let’s take an analogical or comparative example. Does everyone who profess salvation get saved? Matt. 13:1-23, the Parable of the Sower (or Soils), teaches us that an individual can have the word planted in him, but the evil one, persecution, or the worries of life rob or choke it. In modern terms, he heard the word, prayed the “sinner’s prayer,” something may (or may not) have happened, but then he walks away from it all. Salvation is “in” the atonement, but it is not guaranteed. There are too many factors for why the seed of the word did not take hold.

Likewise, healing is “in” the atonement, but it is not guaranteed. We cannot figure out why some people are healed and others are not, for there are too many factors in the life of the sick person, the lives of the people praying for him, and God’s sovereign will.

Personally, I pray this way for the seriously ill, who have, for just one example, cancer:

A.. I pray until healing comes.

B.. I pray for medicine to be effective and the doctors to be successful.

C.. I pray until God takes him home, and then that is the ultimate, eternal healing.

D.. I pray until God reveals to me that it is time to stop praying for his healing because God is using (not causing) the sickness to take the person home to be with Jesus, forever. No, I don’t tell the sick person that, because I could be wrong. Instead, I shift my prayers for spiritual healing and strength and peace and faith in the ill person. (I pray this in the other lettered points, as well.)

How does this post bring me closer to Jesus?

The atonement doctrine has fallen out of “fashion” for postmodern man. Why can’t he just ask for forgiveness and get it? He can, but he has to realize that Christ paid the penalty for humankind’s sin, so that the man or woman can even have a legal standing before God. Without Christ, humankind has no opportunity to ask in the first place. Self-atonement is deficient.

But why did Christ have to go through his sacrificial death? Why couldn’t God just decree it? Man committed great wrong. Justice had to be paid—much like a criminal today has to pay for his wrongs. But what if someone stepped in and paid the penalty for the wrongs? Jesus did that on the cross for us. Now justice is satisfied.

But why the bloody sacrificial death on the cross? Why not just do something else? The problem with that idea is that the Old Testament is full of sacrifices and the shedding of blood.

It is arrogant to sneer at the first-century writers of the New Testament because they did not ignore the fact that animal sacrifices were still going on in the temple at Jerusalem as the priests followed the Old Testament system. This was the system that God himself set up. And God himself presented Christ as the atoning sacrifice to fulfill it. Let’s never abandon Christ on the cross. He did so much for us on Calvary that our condescension towards him is just plain arrogance.

Now the old has given way to the new. Christ through his blood established the New Covenant (Matt. 26:28 // Mark 14:24 // Luke 22:20; cf. 1 Cor. 11:20).

Now by faith we accept his once-and-for-all, eternally applied sacrifice.

Written by James Malcolm

SOURCES

Works Cited at Renewal Theology

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s